North Adelaide Sites

Christ Church (Anglican)

There is no doubt that this limestone church with its detailing in the English Norman style was designed by Henry Stuckey, architect, and that it was begun in 1848; but probably only the choir and transept were erected in Stuckey's lifetime, the apse being built after his death in 1851 ... Continue Reading »

Carclew – House

The first house on this site was built by James Chambers in 1840. The expedition led by John McDouall Stuart to cross the Australian continent from South to North left from this site on 25 October 1861. The house was later owned by ... Continue Reading »

House at 168 Jeffcott Street

House at 168 Jeffcott Street
Described in 1935 as one of Adelaide's 'quaintest' houses, the design of this building has been confidently attributed to the architect George Strickland Kingston. Certainly the elaborate Gothic inspired detailing and crenellation is evidence of an informed hand, but there is significant doubt as to the involvement of any architect ... Continue Reading »

Bishop’s Court

Bishop’s Court
Bishop's Court is a two storey steep roofed stone building of English domestic style with a Tudor influence. Built as residence for the Bishop of Adelaide, by the first Bishop of Adelaide (Bishop Augustus Short) . The building is constructed in limestone, cut stone and ... Continue Reading »

Buffalo Cottage – House

Buffalo Cottage – House
George Stevenson arrived in South Australia in H.M.S. Buffalo in December 1836 as Private Secretary to Governor John Hindmarsh, the Colony's first Governor. In June 1837 Stevenson became editor of South Australian Gazette and Colonial Register.  A year after his arrival, in December ... Continue Reading »

Houses at 42-44 Finniss Street

This pair of semi-detached houses was built in 1851 for William Johnston.  The absence of any verandas suggests that they were designed by a new-comer from England.

St Andrew’s – House

St Andrew’s – House
St Andrews is one of Adelaide's grandest and most impressively sited residences comprising the original dwelling constructed in 1861-62 and a new wing built in about 1881.  It was built by James MacGeorge for his own occupation.  He was an architect of some note and had a sizeable practice embracing ... Continue Reading »

Congregational Church

Congregational Church
This church the classic grace of which so grandly crowns the hill, was begun in 1860 but was not finished until twelve years later.  It is the most baroque of Adelaide's nineteenth century churches and its design appears to owe something to Thomas Archer's St. Phillips, Birmingham, in ... Continue Reading »

Masonic Hall – North Adelaide

Masonic Hall – North Adelaide
Belmont was completed in 1858 for the North Adelaide Masonic and Public Hall Association and designed by Edmund Wright in the Roman Doric style which has symbolic significance for Freemasons. It is of historical significance as an early purpose-built masonic hall - many of the early lodges met ... Continue Reading »

St Mark’s College- Henry Watson’s House

This simple home with its trim little parapet wall and attic bedroom for servants, dates from the 1840's. Beneath the brick exterior however, lies a secret.  The original home was in fact one of Henry Manning's prefabricated timber cottages, shipped out from London and erected here around 1839 by Henry Watson, ... Continue Reading »

Christ Church Rectory

Christ Church Rectory
Christ Church Rectory in Palmer Place, North Adelaide, is one of the most imposing limestone buildings in South Australia.  The style of the building with its brick dressings owes much to contemporary rectories in England though this style stems from cottages of the early seventeenth century.  It was built in ... Continue Reading »

St Margaret’s

St Margaret’s
St Margaret's, erected in the 1890's, is remarkable for its beautiful squared blue stone walls. Dressings are all of brick.  The pyramid like cap was fired in one piece, as well as the caps of the pillars and front porch. The mosaic floor in the porch is said to have been brought to Adelaide from ... Continue Reading »

Taylor House

Taylor House
Taylor House was built around 1908-09 for W.D. Taylor, proprietor of the Lion Timber Mills. It was owned within the Taylor family until 1960 when it was purchased by the Adelaide Children's Hospital.  Like many other Brougham Place mansions it is used as medical offices. The ... Continue Reading »

Kingsmead – House

Kingsmead – House
This town house was built Charles Jacobs in 1865. It was later owned by E.M. Bagot, a pastoralist, of Ned's Corner cattle station and notable for his role in the construction of the overland telegraph between Adelaide and Darwin. The wings on both sides of the main house were ... Continue Reading »

House at 222 Brougham Place

House at 222 Brougham Place
This house as built in 1873 for John Bastin for his own occupation had no veranda on the street front. The present veranda and porch with the unusual pattern of cast-iron work has the feeling of the early twentieth century, as has the bull-nosed roof to the veranda. It remains a ... Continue Reading »

House at 225 Brougham Place

House at 225 Brougham Place
Though built in 1862 this house has a Regency flavour.  The porches are not original.  In 1873 it was bought by J.N. Blackmore, first Secretary in 1864 of the Adelaide Club, and Under Treasurer for South Australia from 1870 to 1875.  He lived here and for him the south wing ... Continue Reading »

Lincoln College – Brougham House

This house, a one-storied version of 58 Brougham Place, was built in 1881 on what had long been the garden of F.S. Dutton's house, now demolished, which stood to the East.  Dutton was twice Premier of South Australia, the second time in 1865; he resigned and became Agent-General in ... Continue Reading »

St Peter’s Anglican Cathedral

St Peter’s Anglican Cathedral
St Peter's Anglican Cathedral is one of Adelaide's most significant architectural landmarks. The original design of the Cathedral was the work of the English architect William Butterfield, but owing to a disagreement over materials to be used, work began under architect E. J. Woods. The foundation stone was laid by ... Continue Reading »

Cottage at 53 Stanley Street

This very simple cottage with its windows opening onto the footpath is a relic of the very early days of Adelaide.  It was built before 1851.

House at 75 Mackinnon Parade

This building with its quiet dignity and careful fenestration was built in 1868 as two semi-detached houses for Sir William Bundey, who was Attorney-General from 1878-1881 and was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court in 1884.  The porch is a later addition.

Lady Ayers Homes – Houses

Lady Ayers Homes – Houses
What became Cottage Homes Incorporated was initiated by Anglican Archdeacon Charles Marryat in 1871 but had an inter-denominational Management Committee.  The organisation's purpose was to fund cottages for the aged poor. The Committee bought an acre of land in North Adelaide and during the 1870s and early 1880s constructed 9 ... Continue Reading »

Cottage at 90 Stanley Street

What became Cottage Homes Incorporated was initiated by Anglican Archdeacon Charles Marryat in 1871 but had an inter-denominational Management Committee.  The organisation's purpose was to fund cottages for the aged poor. The Committee bought an acre of land in North Adelaide and during the 1870s and early 1880s constructed 9 ... Continue Reading »

Cottage at 82 Stanley Street

Cottage at 82 Stanley Street
What became Cottage Homes Incorporated was initiated by Anglican Archdeacon Charles Marryat in 1871 but had an inter-denominational Management Committee.  The organisation's purpose was to fund cottages for the aged poor. The Committee bought an acre of land in North Adelaide and during the 1870s and early 1880s constructed 9 ... Continue Reading »

Gable House

Gable House
This interesting small house, aptly called 'Gable House' is built of stone with brick trim, the corbelling of the brickwork by the front door being noteworthy.  'It was built in 1857 for Moses Frith.  By 1865 R.A. Fiveash lived there and it remained in the hands of that family, including ... Continue Reading »

North Adelaide Police Station Building

The 1864 Police Station originally had the office and quarters in the one building with a lock-up or cell block and walled yard to the rear. The simple bluestone building is a good example of Adelaide's Pre Cast-iron Age.  The verandah was added in 1866. After 35 years it was decided ... Continue Reading »

St Mark’s College – (Kitty) Price Lodge

This house, built in 1875 for W.A. Horn for his own occupation, can be attributed to Rowland Rees, architect.  In 1953, it was brought as the Master's Lodging for St Mark's College, a residential college of The University of Adelaide.

House at 32 Mackinnon Parade

This house, built around 1859, is the smallest example of architect George Kingston's work to survive. George Kingston was trained as an architect in Ireland and arrived in South Australia as Deputy Surveyor General in the Cygnet in September 1836. In 1838 he resigned his position and after two years as Inspector ... Continue Reading »

Kentish Arms Hotel

Kentish Arms Hotel
The hotel was established in 1848 by John Collard Cocker, a cricketer of note.  In September 1848, prior to securing his licences, he invited all lovers of cricket to rally around him with the object of forming a club.  He had brought out from England the necessary cricket materials and the level ... Continue Reading »

City of Churches

City of Churches
Some of the oldest religious structures of the city can be found in North Adelaide, and they are as varied as the faiths they represent. Well-known for its grand stone presence on King William Road, St Peter's Anglican Cathedral has been part of the city's built heritage since laying of the ... Continue Reading »

Crime and Mayhem

Crime and Mayhem
Though unique in its establishment as a free colony in Australia, South Australia is not without its colourful criminal past. The sites included in this tour represent the establishment of the state’s law and order, some dating back to the early days of the colony itself. Highlights include the Magistrates Court, ... Continue Reading »

Survivors from early Adelaide

Survivors from early Adelaide
The sites in this tour represent Adelaide's colonial past and stand as notable examples of the oldest built structures in the city. This tour includes some of the city's best-known public and private heritage buildings, and reveals how some narrowly escaped demolition! Highlights include Ayers House, named for the prominent South Australian ... Continue Reading »

High on the Hill

High on the Hill
Explore North Adelaide's many heritage homes which are as varied as the materials from which they are built. The houses in this tour are significant examples of some of the earliest residential structures found in Adelaide. Highlights include Brougham House, erected in 1881 and now part of Lincoln College of The ... Continue Reading »

Quaker (Society of Friends) Meeting House

Quaker (Society of Friends) Meeting House
Among the early arrivals in South Australia was John Barton Hack, a member of the Society of Friends, or Quakers as they are also known. In 1839 he donated an allotment of land in Pennington Terrace, North Adelaide, upon part of which the Meeting House now stands.  The prefabricated timber building ... Continue Reading »